CHAPTER 26--ABOVE ALL THAT YE ASK--1883-1884. AET. 51-52.

PARIS and Easter-tide : how little had either Mr. or Mrs. Taylor in their long separation imagined such a setting for the reunion that came at length! Even the day or two spent at Cannes had seemed long when the traveller learned who was coming to meet him. Before leaving China he had been much impressed with the prophecy of Zephaniah, especially the closing chapter with its wonderful revelation of the heart of God : " The Lord thy God in the midst of thee is mighty ; He will save, He will rejoice over thee with joy ; He will rest (or " be silent ") in His love, He will joy over thee with singing."

" The whole passage had been made a great blessing to me," he said " but it was not until I reached Paris that I learned the full preciousness of this clause. For there I was met by my beloved wife (after a separation of fifteen months), and as we sat side by side in the cab, though she had so much to say and I had too, I could only take her hand and be silent-the joy was too deep for words. Then it came home to me : if all this of earthly affection is but the type, what must it be when He is `silent in His love' ? And that love is drawn out by our trust. Oh, it is such a pity to hinder ! "

Reaching home at the end of March, Mr. Taylor was in good time for spring and summer meetings, and soon had cause to notice the new position accorded to the Mission in the esteem of the Christian public. The eight years of Mr. Broomhall's unwearied labours had told especially in the direction which was his forte-that of inspiring confidence and making friends. Then, too, the achievements of the pioneers, women as well as men, in effecting a settled residence in almost all the inland provinces had called forth thanksgiving to God. In many parts of the country people were wanting to hear how the seemingly impossible had been brought to pass ; how, without appeals for money or even collections, the work had been sustained ; and how in the most distant parts of China little groups of converts were being gathered. Meetings, therefore-meetings in all directions-soon claimed the leader of the Mission-the unobtrusive man so sure of his great God!

The correspondence of the next two years, the period of Mr. Taylor's stay in England, is deeply interesting from this point of view. To him who had never sought it had come the loving appreciation of high and low, rich and poor, old and young, to a remarkable degree.

" If you are not dead yet," was the charming communication of a child at Cambridge to whom " Hudson Taylor " was a household word, " I want to send you the money I have saved up to help the little boys and girls of China to love Jesus."

" Will -you do me the kindness," urged Canon Wilberforce of Southampton, " to give a Bible reading in my house to about sixty people ... and spend the night with us ? Please do us this favour, in the Master's name."

" Much love to you in the Lord," wrote Lord Radstock from the Continent. " You are a great help to us in England by strengthening our faith."

From Dr. Andrew Bonar came a hundred pounds, forwarded from an unknown Presbyterian friend "who cares for the land of Sinim." Spurgeon sent his characteristic invitations to the Tabernacle, and Miss Macpherson to Bethnal Green.

" My heart is still in the glorious work," wrote Mr. Berger, with a cheque for 500. " Most heartily do I join you in praying for seventy more labourers-but do not stop at seventy! Surely we shall see greater things than these, if we are empty of self and only seeking God's glory and the salvation of souls."

There are letters from the nobleman inviting Mr.Taylor to his castle, and from the old family servant, sending a gift for China after his departure. And there are letters, above all, telling of blessing received in the meetings, not through Mr. Taylor's addresses only, but through his personality and spirit.

" It was the man himself we were drawn to," wrote one of the new friends of this year (the Rev. J. J. Luce of Gloucester). " It was what 'he-was that gave such sweet, undying force to what he did. Behind it all was a wealth of faith and knowledge of God, and of experience in His ways, that made you feel a dwarf indeed in comparison.

"Never can I forget a meeting in our schoolroom one summer evening (June 1883). It was an after-meeting at the close of a Convention for the Deepening of Spiritual Life, and a group of young men gathered round him while he told in the simplest way the story of his student days, and of his preparation for the work in China to which the Lord had called him. The effect on my own spirit, and I think upon others too, was overwhelming. I felt as though I had never yet given up anything for Christ, never yet learned to trust the Lord. . . . I was so moved that I had to ask Mr. Taylor to stop : my heart was broken... . We were only twelve all told on that occasion, but three went to China as a result." 1-{1- And Mr. Luce himself, who wished he could have gone to China, became not only one of Mr. Taylor's best-loved friends, but a member of the London Council and a true prayer helper in the Mission ; a ministry continued to this day.}

"To me,1883 was a place of great darkness," wrote a godly woman occupying a position of influence, " and the foundations of faith were shaken. I did not speak to anyone of what I was passing through, for I knew everything, as I thought, in theory."

Constrained' by the duties of her position to attend a conference of which her husband was Convener, she expected nothing but weariness from the missionary meeting, to which she went conscious of " intense soul-hunger, underneath rebellion and unbelief,"

As Mr. Taylor began to speak," she continued, " a great calm and stillness came over me-a fresh revelation of God's coming down to meet human need. The fountains of my inmost being were broken up . . . I saw a little of what consecration really meant ; and as I began to yield myself to God, fresh hope, light and gladness came into my life-streams that have been flowing ever since."

Many conferences that summer and autumn gave Mr. Taylor access to representative audiences ; opportunities he did not fail to make use of, though in a way all his own.

" When he was speaking," Mr. Luce recalled, " you, could be quite sure that, whatever else he might say, he would make no plea for funds. Often I used to hear him explain, almost apologetically, that his great desire was that no funds should be diverted from other societies to the China Inland Mission ; and that it was for this reason he had taken up lines of working which he hoped would preclude interference with other organisations. Nothing gave him more genuine pleasure than to speak well, of other missions... .

" Oh, the self-emptied spirit, the dignified way in which his life of faith was lived out, the reality of it all! Instead of' wanting to get anything out of you, he was always ready to give to you. His heart and mind were full of that. Some people seem to be asking all the time, though they may not do so in actual words : he-never."

At the Salisbury Conference Canon Thwaites was impressed with Mr. Taylor's humility more than anything else or the way, rather, in which God clothed him with humility." Yet there was power in his addresses, especially in the missionary meeting, a power of the Holy Spirit which " was intense, almost awful " ; and of the praise meeting, with which the Conference ended, Mrs. Thwaites hardly knew how to write. No.reference was made on that occasion to the Inland Mission, but it was for China that lives were consecrated and money flowed in. In spite of there being no collection, people emptied their purses, stripped themselves of their jewels, handed over watches, chains, rings and the like, and gave their lives to God for His service.

Fifteen or sixteen offers for the mission-field were the result, and a whole jewelry case was sent in next day. People had received so much that they felt they could give anything.

So fully were Mr. Taylor's time and strength occupied in these ways that it is amazing to find how much he was doing all the while of correspondence and his own special work in the Mission. From a pair of substantial manuscript books lying before us, we might conclude that he had been wholly engrossed in directorial duties, instead of being almost continuously engaged in meetings. One of these volumes contains a- list of his China letters-when received, when answered, with a line as to their contents-and the other is filled" in the same way with particulars about home correspondence. From this source alone one learns of two thousand six hundred letters attended to by Mr. Taylor personally (Mrs. Taylor often acting as his amanuensis) during a period of ten months, fully taken up with travelling and meetings. Little wonder he began to need a private secretary.

Much prayerful thought was being given also to a subject second to none in its importance, that of organisation within the Mission, on the China side of things -especially. In frequent meetings with the Council and in private conversations, Mr. Taylor was seeking light upon how to prepare for the larger growth that was coming, and after five months at home-busy though he was with Summer Conferences-he sent out a carefully considered letter to all the members of the Mission, stating what was proposed and asking their judgement.1-{1 " It is important to secure that no contingency shall alter the character of the Mission," Mr. Taylor wrote (Aug. 24, 1883), " or throw us off those lines which God has so signally owned and blessed from the commencement. But our home arrangement of assisting the Director by a Council may be introduced into the China work ; the members of that Council may themselves be Superintendents-of' districts, in which capacity they may in their turn be assisted by district Councils of our missionaries. In all this no new principle will be introduced, yet our work will be rendered capable of indefinite expansion while maintaining its original character. Many local matters can thus be locally considered and attended to without delay, and local as well as general developments will be facilitated. I have hitherto had the opportunity of conferring only with those of our number who might be within reach, and that at irregular intervals. The plan I now propose will, through the district Superintendents, bring me into conference with all our missionaries of experience, and will secure an increasingly effective supervision of the whole work. It will also make apparent what has all along been the case-that all important measures are adopted only after full conference with those best qualified to throw light upon them. . . I shall be glad to hear from you how these suggestions strike you, and how far they commend themselves to your mind."}

Meanwhile, out in China the need for reinforcements was increasingly felt. Five only had been sent out in the first quarter of the year, but fifteen sailed in the months that followed, 1-{' The first to sail after Mr. Taylor's return was Mr. Marcus Wood, now and for many years the beloved Secretary of the Mission in England, with whom Mr. J. N. Hayward, for many years Treasurer in Shanghai, has recently been associated.} and many fresh candidates were in touch with the Mission.

"We look anxiously for news of the coming Seventy," wrote Mr. Easton from the north-western province of Shen-si, "and trust that warm-hearted, earnest brothers may join us here."

And from Tai-yuan-fu, the capital of the adjoining province, Dr. Schofield sent a special plea:

We are praying daily for the seventy new labourers, and I hope that at least four of them will come to this province. There are now three or four towns within a day or two's journey, in each of which we have old patients-three of them double cataract cases who can see well. Some of them are not only grateful, but were seemingly interested in the Gospel while with us. These openings I long to see followed up.

He did not say how deeply he was burdened for the whole, great, waiting land, with its teeming millions ; how stealing time from work and rest he was giving himself to prayer, day by day, that men of God might be raised up for its evangelisation ; how labouring beyond his strength he was becoming known not only as the wonder-working doctor, who could restore sight to the blind and almost raise the dead, but as the man with a message, the unwearied preacher with the heart of love.

To the crowded dispensary there came a patient with virulent diphtheria. The doctor did what he could, but having no isolation ward was reluctantly compelled to refuse the poor man admission. Returning later, however, he managed to elude the gate-keeper, and crept into a small room near the entrance, in which before morning he died. Hearing to his concern that a patient had passed away, the doctor hastened to the spot. The odour in the room was overpowering, and a glance revealed the danger to which he and others were exposed. In the prime of his manhood, after only three years in China-the three happiest years of his life, as he had written more than once-Harold Schofield's work on earth was done.

But why recall it now ? What had it to do with the special developments of 1883 ? Only this-that Schofield died Praying. During all the later months of his life, full as they were of splendid service, his chief pre-occupation had been prayer. For this he would leave wife and children, denying himself rest and recreation, and making time at any cost for waiting upon God. It was China that was on his heart-and the sleeping Church at home. And the petition he urged with special fervency was that God would touch the young life of our universities, and raise up men of gifts and education for His work among the heathen. There was no Student Christian Federation in those days, no Volunteer Movement in any of the Colleges. Himself a distinguished prizeman, who had taken more than I400 in scholarships, he knew well the value of thorough mental training ; and remembering all that had been said in his own case about " sacrifice of brilliant prospects, he prayed for a new spirit to come over Christian thinking, more in, harmony with His Who " made Himself of no reputation " that dying souls might live.

It was the 1st of August when Harold Schofield, stricken with a malignant fever, laid down his -life in the work he so truly loved. But the prayers of those last months had not been in vain. News of his death, though cabled to England, did not reach Mr. Taylor immediately, but that very day a letter came to him in the north of England that one cannot but connect with Dr. Schofield's prayers; It was from a young officer in the Royal Artillery who had for some time been thinking of offering himself, he said, for the work of the China Inland Mission. He asked an interview with Mr. Taylor, signing the name that, little as either of them could suppose it, was in due course to replace his own. D. E. Hoste writing from Sandown Fort in July, Stanley P. Smith coming up from Trinity College and his exploits on the river, these and the offers who joined them making the well-known " Cambridge Seven," whose going out awakened a new spirit indeed throughout the universities of the United Kingdom and America, and through them of the world-what were they but the answer to those sacred pleadings in which a believing heart had entered into fellowship with God?

" I have sometimes thought," wrote the author of The Evangelisation of the World, " that in those prayers the greatest work of Harold Schofield's life was accomplished : that, having prayed thus, he had 'finished the work' God had given him to do, and so was taken to his eternal reward." 1-{1 Published a year or two later (188s) under the title A Missionary Band, this remarkable work by Mr. B. Broomhall had a large circulation, and powerfully influenced the founders of the Student Volunteer Movement which came into existence a few-months later, and which Dr. A. T. Pierson characterised as " the epiphany of youth." Apart from the Bible, Dr. Robert Speer has stated, no books so influenced his career as The Evangelisation of the World and Blaikie's Personal Life of Livingstone.}

But if 1883 was memorable, with its many causes for encouragement, what shall be said of 1884; and the movement into which these young men came ? It was a rising tide indeed of spiritual power and blessing ; a year of intense activity, in which Mr. Taylor seemed to do the work of ten ; a year of incessant meetings, and the flowing in of sympathy and gifts as never before ; a year of harvest in the matter of new friends and workers ; and above all a year of close and constant dependence upon God. It was the last of the three years in which the Seventy were to be given, according to the faith that had received them from the Lord ; and given they were in royal fashion-most of the large party that sailed toward the end of October being over and above the number. 2-{2 This was Miss Murray's party, which, proceeding at once to Yangchow, formed the nucleus of the present invaluable Training Home for the study of the language (still under Miss Murray's care), and included the little band who were used of God to inaugurate the now fruitful and extensive work on the Kwang-sin River.} Forty-six in all were sent out during the twelve months ; and it was not only the number but the calibre of the workers that was remarkable. Often must Mr. Taylor have been reminded of the prayer going up from many hearts that the Seventy might be God-sends as well as Godsent to China. `

And here attention may well be drawn to some of the outside influences that contributed to the developments of this wonderful year and the years that followed, chief among which was the second visit of Messrs. Moody and Sankey to the United Kingdom. The foundations of the C.I.M. were laid, as we have seen, at a time when the spiritual life of the churches had been marvellously quickened by the Great Revival of 1859. Moody's first visit in 1873 had brought to the front again the supreme duty of soul-winning, preparing the way for many a forward movement, including the appeal for the Eighteen and the opening up of inland China ; and now, when a fresh advance was to be made in missionary enterprise, the heart of Christian England was being stirred to its depths by a practical, overwhelming demonstration of the power of the Gospel. Who shall say how much the world-wide work of foreign missions owes to these devoted evangelists ?

Then there was a book, equally simple and God-honouring. Published many years before, China's Spiritual Need and Claims had about it a living power. Edition after edition had been called for, and always the same deep spiritual influence seemed to flow from its pages. Steeped in prayer from the first, it had been used of God continually to call forth consecration in His service ; and now enlarged and brought up to date it was to have a new lease of life in the attractive edition of 1884.

" That was the book that did the work," said Mr. Stevenson, who was just home from Burma. " At a single meeting five pounds' worth would be purchased. Many new friends were attached to the Mission as a result, and a constant stream of gifts flowed in.

" It was a time of remarkable progress. Everywhere we had splendid openings, and neither labour nor forethought were spared in making the most of them. It was a new thing to be able to tell of China open from end to end, and the big map we carried with us made it all so real. M'Carthy's walk across China was of unique interest, and I too had travelled overland from Bhamo to Shanghai. Nobody else had such a story to tell in those days, just as no other mission had settled stations far in the interior. The outgoing of party after party introduced us to many new circles, and within the Mission itself all was hope and courage."

But still it was in prayer the work was really done. Quietly, at the back of everything, the spiritual life was maintained at the heart of the Mission. Never had the daily and weekly prayer meetings been more full of power. When Miss Murray's party came up from Glasgow, for example, on their way to China, it was no easy .matter to accommodate all who gathered on Saturday afternoon. Many old friends were present, including the beloved Reginald Radcliffe, aglow with holy enthusiasm. From stirring scenes up north Mr. McCarthy had come, and with him Messrs. Hoste and Stanley Smith. Nothing of excitement followed them, however the presence of God and the sense of responsibility were too deep for that.

"We had a glorious meeting," wrote Mrs. Taylor of this occasion (Oct. 18). " Such power I think I never felt before. It seemed as though the world were being moved in that little room."

In the midst of these experiences Mr: and Mrs. Taylor were facing another long separation. The outgoing of so many new workers urgently called for his presence in China, and she could not be spared from home. He too seemed needed in England-never more so, with doors opening on every hand, candidates applying and friends ready to help. Yet it was in China the fight had to be fought and the new recruits got into line. So the parting had to come, and Hudson Taylor went forward in the spirit of Livingstone's entry in his journal for one of his last, lonely birthdays in central Africa : " My Jesus, my King, my Life, my All again I dedicate my whole self to Thee."

Sending Mr. McCarthy on ahead to deal with the most pressing matters, and leaving Mr. Stevenson to stand by Mr. Broomhall and the Council for a while at home, Mr. Taylor was preparing to set out early in January with a party of young men, including Messrs. Hoste, Stanley Smith, and Cassels, when the unexpected happened, and God's purposes broke in upon these well-laid plans with an overflowing fulness that carried all before it.

It came about very naturally, and apart altogether from design or effort. In his History of the Church Missionary Society, Mr. Eugene Stock speaks of " the extraordinary interest aroused in the autumn of 1884 by the announcement that the captain of the Cambridge Eleven and the stroke oar of the Cambridge boat were going out as missionaries." When the news reached Edinburgh it deeply stirred a group ,of medical students who for some months had been burdened about the indifference to spiritual things in the university, especially among their fellow-medicals. A series of remarkable meetings had just been held at Oxford and Cambridge in which Mr. Taylor and several of the outgoing party had won the sympathies of the undergraduates for foreign missions as never before. But they were too much occupied with preparations for an early departure to be able to follow up even such promising openings. Then it was that, providentially, Reginald Radcliffe came upon the scene-that fervent evangelist whose parish was the world and whose aim nothing less than that the Gospel should be preached " to every creature." Loving Scotland with a special love, he longed to bring the outgoing band into touch with her university life, and on obtaining Mr. Taylor's- permission wrote to Professor Simpson to suggest that Studd and Stanley Smith should visit Edinburgh.1-{1- By this time Messrs.- D. E. Hoste and Stanley P. Smith (stroke of the Cambridge Eight a couple of years previously) and the Rev. W. W. Cassels of St. John's, Cambridge .(late curate of All Souls, South Lambeth, and now Bishop in Western China) had been joined by Mr. C. T. Studd, ex-captain of the Cambridge Eleven. A little later Mr. Montagu Beauchamp, nephew of Lord Radstock, also a university oar, and Messrs. C. P. and A. T. Polhill, sons of a late M.P. for Bedford (" the former an officer in the 2nd Dragoon Guards, and the latter a Ridley Hall Theological student, and both of them prominent Eton and Cambridge cricketers ") made up the party to seven-a strong team from the university man's point of view.}

Coming just at the time when those medical students were earnestly seeking guidance as to how to bring the claims of Christ before their fellows, the suggestion was hailed with thankfulness.

" Many had heard of Stanley Smith," wrote Professor Charteris, " and to every one who knew anything of cricket the name of Studd was familiar. And so the word went round our class rooms, `Let us go and give the athlete missionaries a welcome ! '

" The men gathered-about a thousand, and the two missionaries spoke, well supported by Mr. Landale who is home from China, and others. Smith would have made his mark as an orator anywhere ; he has unusual powers of thought, imagination, and utterance, and a colder man than he would have been roused by the audience to whom he was invited to tell how the ` love of CHRIST constrained' him to give up all home prospects and go to far-off China to preach the Gospel. Studd has not the gifts of an orator, but he never went more straight at the mark in the cricket-field than he did in his manly narrative of the way God had led him for years, from stage to stage of the Christian life, until he was ready to forsake father and mother, home and friends, because of his love for his Redeemer.

" The students were spellbound. Those two speakers were so manly-types indeed of handsome, healthy manhood-were so happy, spoke in such unconventional style, that when they had done hundreds of students, who had little thought of such a thing when they came into the hall, crowded round them to grasp their hand, followed, them to the train by which they were going right off to London, and were on the platform saying God speed you," when the train steamed away."

But that was not to be the end of it. During their campaign with Mr. Radcliffe the latter had seen the possibilities of such work, and had unfolded a plan for further meetings. Invitations had been urgent to return to Scotland, especially from Edinburgh students, and in spite of the early date fixed for the sailing of the party it was hoped that Mr. Taylor might accompany them.

" Could you come," wrote Mr. Stanley Smith to the beloved leader of the Mission ; " and if not, may we go ? "

By this time it was becoming clear to Mr. Taylor that the hand of God was in the movement, and greatly must he have longed to make the most of his share in it. He had been very conscious of the power of the Holy Spirit with those of the seven who had helped him in his meetings, and had seen the influence of their joyous consecration not over students only, but over leaders of Christian life and thought. 1-{1 " The visit of Messrs. Stanley Smith and Studd to Melbourne Hall (Leicester) will always mark an epoch in my own life," wrote the Rev. F. B. Meyer. " Before that time my Christian life had been spasmodic and fitful ; now flaming up with enthusiasm, and then pacing weariedly over leagues of grey ashes and cold cinders. I saw that these young men had something which I had not, but which was within them a constant source of rest and strength and joy. And never shall I forget a scene at 7 A.M. in the grey November morning, as daylight was flickering into the bedroom, paling the guttered candles, which from a very early hour had been lighting up the page of Scripture, and revealing the figures of the devoted Bible-students, who wore the old cricketing or boating costume of earlier days, to render them less sensible of the raw, damp climate. The talk then held was one of the formative influences of my life."

The whole thing was beginning to stand out before him the uniqueness of the opportunity and of the band of fellowworkers who had been given-him; the evident purpose of the Lord of the Harvest to use them along lines that had always been his own ideal-through the deepening of spiritual life among His people, to thrust out many fresh labourers into. His harvest. How his heart was in it all ; how he would have rejoiced to stay and help 1 But, for him, duty clearly pointed in another direction.

Thus then it was arranged : Mr. Taylor going on ahead to get through important matters awaiting his attention in Shanghai, and Mr. Radcliffe undertaking, with Mr. Broomhall and others, the campaign that was to be so far-reaching in its results. One notable meeting Mr. Taylor had at Exeter Hall, when all the outgoing party were present-a meeting which in measure prepared him for Mr. Eugene Stock's comment

The influence of such a band of men going to China was irresistible. No such event had occurred before ; and no event of the century had done so much to arouse the minds of Christian men to the tremendous claims of the Field, and the nobility of the missionary vocation.1-{1 " The gift of such a bandto the China Inland Mission-truly it was a gift from God," continued the Editorial Secretary of the C.M.S., " was a just reward to Mr. Hudson Taylor and his colleagues for the genuine unselfishness' with which they had always pleaded the cause of China and the world, and not of their own particular organisation, and for the deep spirituality which had always marked their meetings: And that spirituality marked most emphatically the densely crowded meeting: in different places at which these seven men said farewell. They told, modestly and yet fearlessly, of the Lord's goodness to them, and of the joy of serving Him ; and they appealed to young men, not for their Mission, but for their Divine Master. No such missionary meeting had ever been known as the final Lathering at Exeter Hall on February 4, 1885. We have be-}The whole thing was beginning to stand out before him the uniqueness of the opportunity and of the band of fellowworkers who had been given-him; the evident purpose of the Lord of the Harvest to use them along lines that had always been his own ideal-through the deepening of spiritual life among His people, to thrust out many fresh labourers into His harvest. How his heart was in it all ; how he would have rejoiced to stay and help ! But, for him, duty clearly pointed in another direction.Thus then it was arranged : Mr. Taylor going on ahead to get through important matters awaiting his attention in Shanghai, and Mr. Radcliffe undertaking, with Mr. Broomhall and others, the campaign that was to be so far-reaching in its results. One notable meeting Mr. Taylor had at Exeter Hall, when all the outgoing party were present-a meeting which in measure prepared him for Mr. Eugene Stock's comment The influence of such a band of men going to China was irresistible. No such event had occurred before ; and no event of the century had done so much to arouse the minds of Christian men to the tremendous claims of the Field, and the nobility of the missionary vocation. 1-{1 " The gift of such a band to the China Inland Mission-truly it was a gift from God," continued the Editorial Secretary of the C.M.S., " was a just reward to Mr. Hudson Taylor and his colleagues for the genuine unselfishness' with which they had always pleaded the cause of China and the world, and not of their own particular organisation, and for the deep spirituality which had always marked their meetings: And that spirituality marked most emphatically the densely crowded meeting= in different places at which these seven men said farewell. They told, modestly and yet fearlessly, of the Lord's goodness to them, and of the joy of serving Him ; and they appealed to young men, not for their Mission, but for their Divine Master. No such missionary meeting had ever been known as the final gathering at Exeter Hall on February 4, 1885. We have become familiar since then with meetings more or less of the same type, but it was a new thing then. In many ways the Church Missionary Society owes a deep debt of gratitude to theChina Inland Mission and the Cambridge Seven. The Lord Himself spoke through them; and it was by His grace that the Society had ears to hear." (From the History of the Church Missionary Society , Vol.3, p.285}

But it was not in public gatherings that these men were knit to their leader and the Mission with which they had cast in their lot. It was behind the scenes in quiet hours the work was done, and chiefly in times of prayer at Pyrland Road, as on the last day of 1884. There was no disguising on these occasions the poverty, as far as material resources were concerned, of the Mission that had closed its latest balance sheet with only ten pounds in hand" ten pounds and all the promises of God." But how small a matter this seemed with the presence of the Lord Himself so consciously felt! It never had been Mr. Taylor's way to minimise the. trials that awaited young workers in China, especially if they desired to identify themselves with the people along the lines of the C.I.M. Speaking of himself in the third person, one of the Cambridge Party recalled

Mr. Taylor was careful to set before him the real character of life and work in inland China, telling him quite plainly that it involved isolation, privation, exposure to the hostility of the people and the contempt of his own countrymen, and also many trials of faith, patience and constancy.

" Mr. Hoste went away deeply impressed with the character of the man with whom he had been speaking," was the young officer's only comment, " and with his heart more than ever set upon becoming a missionary in China."

Very memorable to such a spirit was that New Year's Eve spent in prayer and fasting. When Mr. Taylor left London three weeks later, some of the party were again in Scotland, rejoicing to tell of all the wealth they were finding in deeper fellowship with Christ, which so far outweighed anything of worldly advantage they were laying down. And in a blinding snow-storm, as he crossed France alone, the traveller's heart was full of praise for news received only that morning from the northern capital

" Two thousand students last night-wonderful times It is the Lord."

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